Forest Art Exhibition Oct 5-10

Opening this Friday October 5, Forest Art features works by Lindy Lynch, Dianne Ingram, Hannah Massey, Many Nolan and many more:

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Mullumbimby Steiner School announces fifteenth Wearable Arts event

For everyone who wishes they could have gone to a Steiner school, where beauty and creativity are part of the curriculum, Shearwater's Wearable Arts is an opportunity to unleash your imagination (and your sewing machine, hot glue gun or maybe even your welder!).

This year marks the Mullumbimby Steiner school's fifteenth Wearable Arts event, known by staff and students as WAVE – Wearable Arts Vision in Education, and the school is calling on creatives from around Australia to enter costumes.

The title of this year's event is 'Homecoming: Labyrinth of Twists and Turns'. Entries will be assessed by a panel of independent industry judges and vie for a prize pool of almost $8,000, making the event one of Australia's largest.

Costumes, which must be relevant to one of the event's five sections, can be sewn, riveted, welded, glued, painted, collaged, knitted, woven, built and assembled from metal, leather, rubber, natural fibres, industrial waste and recycled objects. The entries are then incorporated into a highly professional choreographed production, which will take place in the Shearwater hall, in November.

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According to WAVE Production Coordinator Joshua Rushton, it is always an exciting moment when the intricate and extravagant garments begin arriving at the school, where they are embraced by the student-led production, an all-singing all-dancing theatrical spectacular.

“The story is always drawn from the life of teaching and learning and is deeply concerned with the passage of students from adolescence to adulthood," sais Rushton.

A highlight of the school’s performing arts calendar, the event is also a ton of fun, with around 200 students taking on roles as musicians, actors, writers, filmmakers and editors, lighting and audio technicians, carpenters, dancers, singers, tailors, artists, set and prop designers and makers, choreographers, photographers, graphic designers, stage hands, models, judges, ushers, and caterers.

"The students’ engagement in the experience teaches them logic, consequences and cause and effect; encourages and fosters heartfelt idealism and cultivates will, so they can go into the world as responsible, confident and capable adults,” said Rushton.

The performances will take place from November 7 to 10.  All entry forms must be received by October 16. A late entry fee will apply to entry forms received after September 27. Closing date for costume entries is October 22.

See the shearwaterperformingarts.com website for section descriptions and an entry form for the 2018 event, as well as an explanation of what defines wearable art and photos and video of previous Wearable Arts performances at Shearwater. 

If you require any further information about Wearable Arts, please contact costume entry supervisor Praba Manning prabam@shearwater.nsw.edu.au or phone Shearwater on (02) 6684 3223.

Silly Sticky Fingers & All opens at JEFA Gallery

Silly Sticky Fingers & All - an exhibition featuring works of art by John Smith and Vitor Dos Santos - opens tomorrow night, 5:30pm, at JEFA Gallery in Bangalow.

 Vitor Dos Santos,  SMOOTH SEAS  - MIXED MEDIA ON BOARD - 80 x 75cm - $1,500

Vitor Dos Santos, SMOOTH SEAS - MIXED MEDIA ON BOARD - 80 x 75cm - $1,500

Vitor Dos Santos, a bilingual artist who travelled throughout his childhood, uses an eclectic mix of materials often on plywood - Charcoal, graphite, pencil, newspaper and acrylic paint. The artist imaginatively explores a disenchanted popular mass culture by provoking questions about language, travel communication and social hierarchies.

"Through an almost compulsive drawing process I was able to generate ideas and follow certain narratives, which led me to the absurdity of these paintings. The loose line work, rapid application of paint and childlike irreverence to formal etiquette only adds to the ironic disposition of the work". - Vitor Dos Santos

John Smith has developed a mixed media painting practice influenced by mid-20th century European "Art Brut" and "Art Informel". His lyrical, gestural painting process draws little distinction between the abstract and the concrete, similar to the raw and intuitive manner of child-like scribble and pre-lingual development of sounding in "toddlers".

"I invent glyphs and symbols to draw attention to the beautiful irony of the way we try to learn language and make meaning of life. I use anecdotes of lived experiences with young children, social narrative and myths. Rememberence resonates interweaving the 'carnivalesque' spirit of child play and the existential dilemma of human mortality." - John Smith
 John Smith,  BLACK BOARD GRONK - AHEAD OF STORM , ACRYLIC ON CANVAS ON BOARD - 122 x 100cm - $5,000

John Smith, BLACK BOARD GRONK - AHEAD OF STORM, ACRYLIC ON CANVAS ON BOARD - 122 x 100cm - $5,000

 Vitor Dos Santos,  EMPTY TANKS  - MIXED MEDIA ON BOARD - 120 x 90cm - $2,500

Vitor Dos Santos, EMPTY TANKS - MIXED MEDIA ON BOARD - 120 x 90cm - $2,500

 John Smith,  SNAPPY JACK  - ACRYLIC ON PAPER UNDER GLASS - 59 x 42cm - $1,950

John Smith, SNAPPY JACK - ACRYLIC ON PAPER UNDER GLASS - 59 x 42cm - $1,950

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'Life is a Marathon': Geoff Todd at Mitchell Fine Art

The common analogy ‘Life is a Marathon’ is explored by artist Geoff Todd in his new exhibition showing at Mitchell Fine Art in Fortitude Valley, Brisbane from 25th July.
 

   'Cul de Sac',    122 x 122cm, acrylic, charcoal and cotton gauze on canvas

'Cul de Sac', 122 x 122cm, acrylic, charcoal and cotton gauze on canvas


Culminating thirty years of artistic observation, Todd presents a series of poignant, powerful and sometimes aggressive artworks of two young female muses besieged with the contest of life. 
 
Each muse whilst from different backgrounds, share remarkable similarities in the successes and failures they have persevered through in their lives. Todd’s paintings centre around intimate and personal connections with his subjects, whilst exploring the broader themes of life’s challenges.
 
With his recognisable figurative style, Todd presents the positive with the pain. This is an exhibition about life and its struggles. It is about running the gauntlet, running to win or even just running to participate”.
 
Marathon explores life’s hardships, its challenges, successes, failures and ultimately our ability to endure. The exhibition is showing from 25th July – 18th August 2018 at Mitchell Fine Art in Fortitude Valley, Brisbane.
 
Join Geoff Todd for the opening of his new show on Friday 27thJuly from 6 – 8pm. This is a free event.
 
On Saturday 28th July at 2pm, Geoff will also hold an Artist talk in the gallery discussing his work and inspiration.


NEED TO KNOW

OFFICIAL OPENING: Friday 27th July from 6pm – 8pm

ARTIST TALK: Saturday 28th July from 2pm

Artists explore Australia as an exotic land

Australian exotica, a new travelling exhibition from Monash Gallery of Art (MGA), opens at Tweed Regional Gallery & Margaret Olley Art Centre on Friday 20 July.

Drawing on MGA's nationally significant collection of Australian photographs, the exhibition showcases the works of some of Australia's most celebrated artists, engaging with the theme of the exotic antipodes.

 Peter Dombrovskis, Lake Oberon, Western Arthur Range, south-west Tasmania 1988, pigment inkjet print, 74.5 x 94.2cm

Peter Dombrovskis, Lake Oberon, Western Arthur Range, south-west Tasmania 1988, pigment inkjet print, 74.5 x 94.2cm

 Joseph McGlennon, Florilegium #1 2014 from the series Florileigum, pigment ink-jet print, 127 x 100cm

Joseph McGlennon, Florilegium #1 2014 from the series Florileigum, pigment ink-jet print, 127 x 100cm

Since the 15th century, when European cartographers began including the contour of Terra Australis Incognita ('the unknown land of the south') in their speculative maps of the globe, the continent of Australia has been thought of as an exotic place. And when European explorers finally reached the southern continent, reports of unfamiliar flora, fauna and indigenous people only perpetuated this striking vision.

The characterisation of Australia as a land down under, where things are out of the ordinary and colourfully unconventional, remains a key feature of this country's national identity. No longer just a projection of a European imagination, Australians themselves have come to celebrate the topsy-turvy nature of life in the land of Oz, where marsupials lay eggs, Christmas celebrations take place at the height of summer, and water supposedly goes down the drain in an anticlockwise direction.


MGA Curator, Stella Loftus-Hills, said of the exhibition: "Our aim is to provide people with the opportunity to achieve a deeper appreciation of photography. This exhibition includes prominent Australian photographs that relate to what it means to be an Australian, or at least what someone looking in might think about this country."

"I hope people would leave the exhibition feeling as though they had experienced something new about photography and Australia, something  that perhaps they hadn't realised before," she said.

Australian exotica features the work of 11 prominent Australian photographers, including Brook Andrew, Michael Cook, Destiny Deacon, Peter Dombrovskis, Marian Drew, Leah King-Smith, Joseph McGlennon, Tracey Moffatt, Darren Siwes, Robyn Stacey and Christian Bumbarra Thompson.

All are welcome to attend the opening celebrations at Tweed Regional Gallery on Friday 27 July at 6pm with guest speaker Craig Tuffin, Photographic Artist.

The exhibition will be opened in conjunction with Experimenta Make Sense and Alison Allcock: Exchange. The exhibition runs from 20 July to 23 September 2018.

CUBE to exhibit Noel Hart glass works

CUBE, the smallest gallery in the Southern Hemisphere, is located in Mullumbimby.

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July 10 sees a change over of art in the CUBE. Artists Noel Hart and Curator Dev Lengjel met at 2pm in the council admin in Mullumbimby to change over the exhibition from Jennifer Grainger to Noel Hart.

Noel Hart is a multi-disciplinary visual artist who has lived in the rainforest of Huonbrook, west of Mullumbimby for 30 years. In that time he has developed a unique visual language utilising blown glass in an expressive painterly manner. This work has been exhibited internationally
for the last 20 years.

The colours in the glass reference either species of parrots which are at risk of extinction, or, if they do survive the present onslaught, the colours of speculative as yet unevolved species.

Woven Sculpture, Wearable Art and Sound Installation at Dust Temple

DUST TEMPLE
Presents

NEST
Exploring The Ephemeral Nature Of Home

 Saturday 7th July - Thursday 2nd August

@ DUST TEMPLE, 54 Currumbin Creek Road, Currumbin

OPENING NIGHT - Saturday 7th July 2018 @ 6pm

 

A Multiple Disciplinary Art Exhibition


Featuring Woven Sculpture,  Wearable Art, and Sound Installation as a unique body of work created by two local emerging artists

Anaheke Metua & WHAIA

Diving deep into their cultural roots and showcasing a unique set of skills in woven sculpture, wearable art, and sound installation
these bold and authentic artists have created an exhibition that is a compelling ode to the strength,
beauty, and skill of our avian counterparts.
 
Their
complimentary artworks explore the rich symbolism of the NEST as an ephemeral home through texture, malleability, colour, use of raw materials, sound and video.



Sculptor and Fibre Artist
 
Anaheke Metua

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This body of work is a retrospective view of the many and varied homes that have shaped Anaheke’s life and work as an artist.
 
This process has nurtured an inward journey through her bloodlines, cultural
beliefs and behaviors regenerating her idea of  home to reshape and strengthen her NEST for the next generation.


Sonic Weaver

&

Wearable Arts Designer


Whaia creates a range of Fine Art Headwear embellished with a wide spectrum of crystals, up-cycled antique jewelry, and fabrics complimenting the energy of each individual piece,
destined to get your attention and awaken the inner Goddess

As a ‘Sonic Weaver’, Whaia integrates her collection of Traditional First Nations instruments, Singing Crystal Bowls and divine vocals, bringing forth her unique delivery of Sacred Sonic Ceremonies.

Whaia nurtures you through her meditation sound journeys, creating an atmosphere that is sure to put a lasting resonance in your cells.


 

The Eighth Annual Grace Cruice Memorial Exhibition

Northern Rivers Community Gallery (NRCG) Ballina launches an exciting new exhibition this month and welcomes community and visitors to join us in the Gallery.

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The Eighth Annual Grace Cruice Memorial Exhibition features new 2D and 3D fine art works by members of Ballina Arts and Crafts Centre Inc. The exhibition showcases the diverse talents of the group which draws its members from all over the Northern Rivers region.

This exhibition celebrates the role played by early BACCI members in the establishment of the Northern Rivers Community Gallery and through this display, also hopes to encourage new members to join and share BACCI’s passion for creativity.

Exhibition opens Wednesday 6 June 2018 and continue until Sunday 1 July 2018. The official launch event is Thursday 7 June from 5.30pm – 7.30pm and all are welcome to attend.

The Trailer Project presents: John Witzig

The Trailer Project will present The Lure of the Sea by John Witzig opening Thursday, June 14 at Lismore Regional Gallery.

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THE TRAILER PROJECT PRESENTS
THE LURE OF THE SEA


JOHN WITZIG

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at 5:00 pm Thurs 14 June 2018
Exhibition continues until Friday 22 June 2018


image: Cactus Landscape 1975, digital print


thetrailerproject@gmail.com
www.thetrailerproject.com
 

Indigenous Artist Blak Douglas on Government Transparency at JEFA

Openness, accountability, and honesty define government transparency. In a free society, transparency is government's obligation to share information with the people. It is at the heart of how citizens hold their public officials accountable.
 
Artist Blak Douglas asks: Do governments in fact serve the people?
What covenant has been made to the original custodians of this land?

  Don't Mess with the Missionary Man  2018, 120 x 100 cm

Don't Mess with the Missionary Man 2018, 120 x 100 cm

"Transparent Covenant explores the farcical landscape of 'Australian' politics and unashamedly portrays the systemic conspiratorial actions of successive governments to uphold the genocide on first nations peoples of this continent," says artist Blak Douglas. "I employ the ubiquitous 'toilet door' figurative logos as a perfect exemplar of the faceless Aboriginal individual today. The soul stripped countryman living at the bottom of the pile amidst an ever-growing fraternity of egotistical power brokers and their 'do good' policies."

  Dog's Breakfast

Dog's Breakfast

“Blak Douglas’s work is highly significant and profoundly bold in its depiction and message. What we have here is an artist that is completely dedicated to delivering the truth as he has it. Particularly focusing on what it means to be an Aboriginal man with part Irish decent in the 21st century. All the cultural clichés that haunt him and the ironies present within the “Australian Dream”.

- Julian Edwards JEFA Gallery

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EXCAVATIONS OF THE DEEP: Artist Jess Leitmanis on her solo show at Lone Goat Gallery in Byron Bay

Perhaps the first thing you should know about me is that I have over 720 kgs of marine debris rope in my possession. I wasn’t always this wealthy. This didn’t come about by pure chance. I’ll endeavour to enlighten you on what led me to this juncture, how I became the proud guardian of this unusual bounty, and what I’ve been doing with it...

me and ball of rope - cmyk.jpg

I wear a mask when working. Micro-plastics break away and become airborne during the unravelling and weaving process. It sticks. To my clothes. To my eyelashes. To my mind. Without a mask, my nostrils would become coated with a fine plastic dust. I have experienced this once, early on, working with coloured rope. Yes. Bad news. I keep the majority of the broken fragments and fibres that are too small to weave, because this is an important part of the story and the lifespan of our ‘stuff’. It is interesting to note that on a molecular level, the composition of plastic is so complex that it cannot return to an organic state. This in itself is food for thought... Perhaps not only in the abstract sense.

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Each piece of rope behaves differently depending on the composition of filaments and the quirks nature has imposed on it. In working with this material, I’m forced to be adaptable and responsive, rather than attaching myself to a rigid idea of an outcome. Art basically teaches me about life. It is in the challenges that I find the most potential for growth.

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The triggers for my work are undoubtedly environmental in sentiment, but the conversations that really intrigue me are ones that explore the motivations that have led us here. I work with the excess of human society, the bits that have fallen through the cracks. I look at the objects we construct; their function, design, and lifespan; I'm interested in what they tell us about ourselves and our values as collective culture. I'm basically wanting to hack open and inspect the thought processes that brought about this version of reality. What is driving us? Human choice. Behaviour patterns. Values. Biology. Environment. Information. Disconnect. I want to understand the influences, and consider the alternatives. So my artwork is about creating dialogue. And that’s also what I do when I find these bits of debris. I have a little chat with it...

I imagine the journey it has been on; the lengths it has traveled to find me; here, in it’s current disheveled state. The rope holds character. Experience is etched into its sun weary flesh. An old sailor, brittle, faded, baked and ravaged by the ocean, and the elements. Character is why I choose rope in favour of other debris. I unravel it to highlight the variation between the interior and the exterior. The exposed parts of the rope hold the charms that only time and a life of experience can impart. Sheltered inside the twist are fibres still strong and vibrant in colour. Once the rope is unraveled we begin to see the full picture, a timeline of sorts. With each piece I work with a fairly restricted colour palette, so that the rope and its character can do the talking. I’m focusing on the texture of the rope, the degradation of a material.

In my current exhibition and previous works, I’m being quite playful with the titles of my art. I reflect on the past, and how we use relics to draw conclusions about former civilisations. Then, I use that lens to challenge how we see ourselves in the modern day. A contemporary archaeology of sorts. Perhaps helping us step outside the present moment and observe ourselves from a different vantage point. Initially I found it hard to articulate what I was doing with these names, because there’s another side to that coin. It’s me having a laugh during the creation process. Making light of a grim situation, or the absurdity of humans... My humour can be quite dark. So I think it’s one of those things that came about intuitively, or subconsciously, and then I understood its purpose later. Also, I think that dark humour, and being quite cynical at times, is strangely what makes me so fiercely optimistic. There’s something about laughter in that darkness, that reminds you there’s always a way out. Dark and light are often found in the journey of making art, funnily enough.

There’s definitely something in the idea of duality, of opposites, that I’m intrigued about or drawn to. It’s something I play on a bit with my new body of work. I’m looking at the inter-related nature of things and curious parallels. The relationship between mind and matter. To what degree does our internal world influence our external world? To what degree does our environment influence our thoughts? The seen and the unseen. The surface and the submerged. The conscious and the subconscious. Perhaps it’s all one and not the same.

For me, art is an invitation to look at the world through a different lens. Still, we all respond with our own eyes and our own individual set of experiences. It is impossible to do otherwise. That is the cool thing... An artwork exists, resonates, connects in a different way with each of us. Every person breathes into it, different life.


EXCAVATIONS OF THE DEEP
A contemporary archaeological dig of mind and matter.
@lonegoatgallery
23 March – 18 April 2018

Jessica Leitmanis
jessicaletimanis.com
instagram: jessleitmanis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We're Closer Than You Think: Northern Rivers Artists

Part of ArtState 2017, We’re Closer Than You Think brings together artwork by several artists based in the Northern Rivers. The exhibition questions the notion of regionality and the perception that artists working outside of metropolitan areas are hindered by location.
 
In various stages of their career and working across a range of disciplines, each artist in the exhibition was chosen for inadvertently refuting the relationship between location and success, population and production, and that the quality of their practice is determined by these imaginary borders.

Be quick! We’re Closer Than You Think will be open until Friday 8 December.
 
Co-curated by Natalie Bull and Zoe Robinson-Kennedy.

 Image: Helle Jorgensen,  The lofty thoughts generator and processor . Photo by Michelle Eabry.

Image: Helle Jorgensen, The lofty thoughts generator and processor. Photo by Michelle Eabry.

Artists

Skye Baker
Amanda Bromfield
Kylie Caldwell
Ben Crawford
Michael Cusack
Karla Dickens
Kathryn Dolby
Penny Evans
Stephen Garrett
Natalie Grono
Charlotte Haywood
Helle Jorgensen
Jenny Kitchener
Mahala Magins
Robert Moore
Jess O’Connor
Kat Shapiro-Wood
Amber Wallis
Christine Willcocks
 

Location

The OLD Gallery
(next to Palate Cafe)
131 Molesworth St
Lismore, NSW 2480
 
 

BSA ArtState Exhibitions: APOLLO & Nine

Byron School of Art is presenting two exhibitions as part of ArtState: Nine, at the BSA Project Space, and APOLLO in Lismore.

  Diana Miller's  Quilted Earth , acrylic on linen

Diana Miller's Quilted Earth, acrylic on linen

Also, BSA Alumni are showing throughout Lismore, including at the old Lismore Regional Gallery site.

FRIDAY 1 December 6 - 8pm : Opening of Nine

BSA PROJECT SPACE
112 Dalley St, Mullumbimby
Exhibition runs from 1 - 13 December
Open six days, closed Sundays, 10am to 2pm
or by appointment 0431 034 892

 

 

Showing as part of ArtState Lismore 2017


Apollo

AMAC
James Guppy
Alex Hudson
Travis Paterson
Melissa Poole
Zuzana Kovar & Nicholas Skepper
Christine Willcocks
 


An assembly without the limits of the square

30 November - 3 December 2017
 

  James Guppy's  Touching her back , acrylic on canvas, 2016  

James Guppy's Touching her back, acrylic on canvas, 2016  

Apollo is a group show from the Byron School of Art BSA Project Space.  It is a re-pairing of works and an assembly without the limits of the square: both documenting a number of past exhibitions and responding to the semi-submerged toy theatre where the exhibition is housed.
 

NORTHERN RIVERS CONSERVATORIUM OF MUSIC
Downstairs Studio, 152 Keen Street, Lismore
Thursday 12pm - 3pm | Friday 10am - 8pm
Saturday 10am - 8pm | Sunday 10am - 3pm

Art on Bundjalung Country

 

Art on Bundjalung Country opens tonight at Lismore Regional Gallery.

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Increasingly, creativity is being seen as a major indicator in increasing people’s health and wellbeing. Art on Bundjalung Country is a major partnership between the Gallery, Arts Northern Rivers, North Coast Primary Health Network, Bulgarr Ngaru Aboriginal Medical Corporation and University Centre for Rural Health to stimulate artistic practice for emerging Aboriginal artists to enhance their social, economic and health outcomes. This partnership is advised by a committed steering group of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal arts and health professionals.

Throughout 2017, a series of workshops have been held across the region by established Aboriginal artists including Penny Evans, Gilbert Laurie, Francis Belle-Parker, Michael Philp, Cherie Leon and Robin Davis to pass on their creative skills to a wide range of emerging Aboriginal artists. The result will be an exhibition acknowledging the depth of current practice in the region, and celebrating the next crop of up and coming Aboriginal artists working in Bundjalung country.

Friday, December 8, 2017 at 5.30pm (for 6.00pm speeches)

To be opened by Dr Vahid Saberi, Chief Executive Officer, North Coast Primary Health Network.

Speeches will be followed by a performance by the Nini Nahri-Gali dance Troupe.

Artists: Apply to exhibit at Lone Goat Gallery in Byron

Applications to exhibit at Lone Goat gallery are now open. Applications for the 2018 program will be accepted until January 31 2018. Lone Goat Contemporary community art gallery is located in downtown Byron Bay, right across the road from the beach.

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Applications for the 2018/19 exhibition program close: 31 JANUARY 2018.
Applicants advised of outcome of their application by email: 28 FEBRUARY 2018
To download an application form, click HERE

 
Lone Goat Gallery is now accepting Exhibition proposals from artists, designers, curators, community and cultural groups.


Lone Goat Gallery encourages exhibitions which showcase the high calibre and creativity of artists and crafts practitioners from the Northern Rivers region and further afield.
 
Lone Goat Gallery welcomes all art forms and cultural heritage that display innovative ideas and approaches to contemporary arts practice. The gallery program features exhibitions of 4 weeks-duration.
 

 

Art Piece Gallery's Inaugural 30x30 Art Prize Winners Revealed

Saturday evening revealed the (joint!) Winners of the inaugural Art Piece Gallery 30x30 Art Prize: Kat Shapiro Wood, and Vanessa Stockhard.

The $6000 prize will be divided between the two artists. As expected, a huge crowd turned out to witness the announcement. The previous day, judges Susi Muddiman OAM and artist Amanda Penrose Hart, winner of the 2017 Gallipoli art prize had considered all 230 pieces, and after much deliberation, decided to equally divide the First Prize between two artists. The exhibition of finalists will be on view at the gallery until January 22 2018.

The Winners:

Joint First Prize

  Kat Shapiro Wood  Hover, encaustic on board, 30 x 30 cm

Kat Shapiro Wood
Hover, encaustic on board, 30 x 30 cm

Other awards:


Best Still Life in Show
Nick Coulson
Still Life with Jug, Hallway and Windows I
acrylic and graphite on board
30 x 30 cm

Highly Commended Awards
Gaia Barnatan
Head in the clouds
photocollage
30 x 30 cm(framed)

Clare Purser
Fassifern Valley III
oil and mixed media on board,
30 x 30 cm(framed)

 Gaia Barnatan,  Head in the clouds

Gaia Barnatan, Head in the clouds

People's Choice Award
Kindly sponsored by The Mullumbimby Chamber of Commerce
This is a newly added prize of $500.00 and is only available
by voting in person, at the gallery.

This new, national, non-acquisitive prize is for a 2D work of art in any medium measuring 30x 30 cm.

  Vanessa Stockard  Pleasure and Pain, acrylic on board 30 x 30 cm (framed)

Vanessa Stockard
Pleasure and Pain, acrylic on board
30 x 30 cm (framed)

 Nick Coulson  Still Life with Jug, Hallway and Windows I

Nick Coulson
Still Life with Jug, Hallway and Windows I

  Clare Purser ,  Fassifern Valley III

Clare Purser, Fassifern Valley III

The Walls #PRIZENOPRIZE 2017 Artists Announced

CHASE ARCHER, HAILEY ATKINS, JANIS CLARKE, RICKY LARRY,
SOPHIE PENKETHMAN-YOUNG, MELISSA SPRATT, VEOPLE (JAY JERMYN & JULIAN CURRIE)

CURATED BY MARIAM ARCILLA

Opening Saturday 2 December 5 - 8pm

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*Opening night only performance by VEOPLE **Stone & Wood Beer and Miami Mimosa's on the house all eve!  Exhibition continues until 16 December, 2017


Keep your eyes on the no-prize! #PRIZENOPRIZE returns for a second year.


Riding along the undercurrents of Turner Prizes and Archibalds, #PRIZENOPRIZE is an exhibition that champions and democratises art across all media and levels. Think of it as a soft power alternative to the head-churning, nail-biting process that comes with applying for art awards - or being shortlisted for the coveted Bachelor rose of the artworld.


There is no prize money, entry fee or % commission on sales; instead this is an open platform for contemporary and experimental artists (especially emerging artists) across Australia to exhibit/perform at THE WALLS this December -- a prize in itself! They'll be showcasing a cross-section of works, including multi-disciplinary, projection and moving-image based, performance and large-scale installation works.