Silly Sticky Fingers & All opens at JEFA Gallery

Silly Sticky Fingers & All - an exhibition featuring works of art by John Smith and Vitor Dos Santos - opens tomorrow night, 5:30pm, at JEFA Gallery in Bangalow.

Vitor Dos Santos,  SMOOTH SEAS  - MIXED MEDIA ON BOARD - 80 x 75cm - $1,500

Vitor Dos Santos, SMOOTH SEAS - MIXED MEDIA ON BOARD - 80 x 75cm - $1,500

Vitor Dos Santos, a bilingual artist who travelled throughout his childhood, uses an eclectic mix of materials often on plywood - Charcoal, graphite, pencil, newspaper and acrylic paint. The artist imaginatively explores a disenchanted popular mass culture by provoking questions about language, travel communication and social hierarchies.

"Through an almost compulsive drawing process I was able to generate ideas and follow certain narratives, which led me to the absurdity of these paintings. The loose line work, rapid application of paint and childlike irreverence to formal etiquette only adds to the ironic disposition of the work". - Vitor Dos Santos

John Smith has developed a mixed media painting practice influenced by mid-20th century European "Art Brut" and "Art Informel". His lyrical, gestural painting process draws little distinction between the abstract and the concrete, similar to the raw and intuitive manner of child-like scribble and pre-lingual development of sounding in "toddlers".

"I invent glyphs and symbols to draw attention to the beautiful irony of the way we try to learn language and make meaning of life. I use anecdotes of lived experiences with young children, social narrative and myths. Rememberence resonates interweaving the 'carnivalesque' spirit of child play and the existential dilemma of human mortality." - John Smith
John Smith,  BLACK BOARD GRONK - AHEAD OF STORM , ACRYLIC ON CANVAS ON BOARD - 122 x 100cm - $5,000

John Smith, BLACK BOARD GRONK - AHEAD OF STORM, ACRYLIC ON CANVAS ON BOARD - 122 x 100cm - $5,000

Vitor Dos Santos,  EMPTY TANKS  - MIXED MEDIA ON BOARD - 120 x 90cm - $2,500

Vitor Dos Santos, EMPTY TANKS - MIXED MEDIA ON BOARD - 120 x 90cm - $2,500

John Smith,  SNAPPY JACK  - ACRYLIC ON PAPER UNDER GLASS - 59 x 42cm - $1,950

John Smith, SNAPPY JACK - ACRYLIC ON PAPER UNDER GLASS - 59 x 42cm - $1,950

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Tweed Regional Gallery to host free Artist Talks this weekend

Tweed Regional Gallery & Margaret Olley Art Centre will host talks by three diverse Indigenous artists this Sunday, 2 September 2018. 

Multi-media artist Judy Watson, along with regional artists Digby Moran and Michael Philp, will be discussing their artworks currently on exhibition at the Gallery.

Digby Moran with his painting Bundjalung Stone Axe Gift of Margot Anthony AM, through the Tweed Regional Gallery Foundation Ltd., 2018 © The artist

Digby Moran with his painting Bundjalung Stone Axe Gift of Margot Anthony AM, through the Tweed Regional Gallery Foundation Ltd., 2018 © The artist

Judy Watson will speak to her work The Names of Places, currently on display in the touring exhibition Experimenta Make Sense,  as well as her artist prints held in the Gallery's permanent collection, a selection of which are currently on display as part of the Gallery's 30th anniversary exhibition Three Decades: celebrating the Tweed Regional Gallery collection.

Digby Moran and Michael Philp, also featured in Three Decades, will give insight into their works Bundjalung Stone Axe and Spotting for Sea Mullet, respectively.


EVENT DETAILS:

What:  Artist Talks

Where:  Tweed Regional Gallery & Margaret Olley Art Centre

When:  Sunday 2 September at 2pm

Gallery Hours: Wednesday - Sunday, 10am - 5pm

Cost:    Free

Mitjili Napurrula: Solo Aboriginal Art Exhibition

A solo exhibition showcasing Aboriginal artworks that portray stories relating to the ancient ritual of the spear straightening ceremony will open at Mitchell Fine Art in Brisbane on April 4th, 2018.
 
Mitjili Napurrula, a Pintupi artist from Central Australia paints Watiya Juta the Desert Acacia, a source material for Aboriginal spear making and the central motif in her father’s dreaming - the story of the spear straightening ceremony.

Mitjili Napurrula, Watiya Juta, acrylic on linen, 200 x 200cm

Mitjili Napurrula, Watiya Juta, acrylic on linen, 200 x 200cm

Her paintings show the iconography of the trees, red sandhills and rocks of her father’s country to the west of Haasts Bluff in Central Australia.

Under the tutelage of her mother Napurrula began painting the female side to her father’s dreaming in 1993. Her works Watiya Juta portray the topography of her father’s country, Uwalki, and the recurring tree motif, Watiya.
 
The Spear Straightening ceremony is an important Dreaming story dealing with tribal rivalries and ancient rituals and the process of spears being made for battle.

Watiya Juta'   , 60 x 60cm, acrylic on linen

Watiya Juta', 60 x 60cm, acrylic on linen

Watiya Juta'   , 60 x 60cm, acrylic on linen

Watiya Juta', 60 x 60cm, acrylic on linen

In Napurrula’s paintings the figurative and topographical elements are applied in bright, vibrant colours on a translucent veil of white. These colours reflect her own style and playful personality.

Napurrula stems from an impressive artistic family. Born at Ikuntji (Haasts Bluff) an area 200kms west of Alice Springs, her mother was one of the principal female artists at Kintore in the Western Desert and her brother was one of the founding members of the Papunya Tula Artists cooperative.

Napurrula’s works are part of numerous international and national collections including the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Art Gallery of South Australia, National Gallery of Australia and the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory.

On Saturday 7th April at 2pm a floor talk on the life and artistic practice of Mitjili Napurrula will be held in the gallery with Director Mike Mitchell. This is a free event.

SEALEVEL - The Art of Awareness - Ocean Photography Exhibition by Ted Grambeau

Renowned ocean, surf and adventure photographer Ted Grambeau has created a collection of abstract ocean images in hope of bringing our attention to the very real issue of climate change.

For over 40 years, Melbourne-born Ted Grambeau has been consumed by his quest to capture the world through his lens. It's an obsession that has led him on a journey to nearly 100 countries, exhausting over a dozen passports. He’s mostly known for leading adventure expeditions into remote locations in search of undiscovered waves and is most at home when deeply immersed in the ocean.

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“Photography is more than a passion, it is my life,” he says. With formal studies in Illustrative photography at RMIT University in Melbourne, Grambeau communicates an intimate relationship with light, a sophisticated understanding of its various expressions – the refraction, reflection and absorptions. The documentary nature of this project requires that Ted be at the waters edge before dawn, when most of us haven’t even thought about opening our eyes.

When he’s not chasing monster waves half way around the world, he prefers to live by the ocean at Currumbin on the Gold Coast. Finding balance, Ted keeps life ‘low key’ but when given the opportunity to share his thoughts on photography an animated creative is revealed.

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He is inspired by the Masters Henri Cartier-Bresson and Sebastião Salgado. A photojournalist style is expressed in his work after having spent his formative time assisting the great Magnum legend Burt Glinn of New York.

As Ted explains his views on environmental issues, he touches on the frustration he feels towards climate change and the urgency of action that needs to occur before our sea levels rise beyond the point of no return. “The effects will be devastating before we actually notice.” he says.

Image courtesy Trent Mitchell

Image courtesy Trent Mitchell

Ted is one of the world’s great surf and ocean photographers. Over the past 30 or so years he’s had more surf magazine covers than he can remember. His CV of magazine articles, expeditions, movies and books is an afternoon's read in anyone's language. He studies and monitors weather maps and understands the intricacies of an impending swell forecast well in advance. He has traveled to locations that will be lost, submerged under water once the sea levels start to rise due to the change in climate.


Excited by the prospects of exhibiting his work again, Ted reflects on the first time he showed his SEALEVEL Series at the Pipeline Gallery in Hawaii. Special guests like Kelly Slater and leading environmentalist Jack Johnson came along, with Jack’s wife Kim selecting a few pieces to hang in their home on the North Shore. And then in Sydney at the prestigious Stanley Street Gallery in Darlinghurst as a featured solo exhibition for the Head On Photo Festival. “It’s always great to spend some time chatting with art collectors and critics, all with an ecstatically positive response so far. “It’s nice to use my photography in a positive manner and that I have something to give and make a contribution for spending a bit of time on the planet.”

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sealevel #3

sealevel #3

Ted’s current exhibition is showing at the Hinge Gallery, located at the Dust Temple in Currumbin as part of the Bleach Festival and Gold Coasts Arts and Culture feature coinciding with the 2018 Commonwealth Games celebrations. Opening night will be a bit special as Grambeau will be launching and signing copies of his new book Adventures in Light - a photographic journey spanning four decades combined with his abstract ocean photography exhibition SEALEVEL - The Art of Awareness.

BSA ArtState Exhibitions: APOLLO & Nine

Byron School of Art is presenting two exhibitions as part of ArtState: Nine, at the BSA Project Space, and APOLLO in Lismore.

Diana Miller's  Quilted Earth , acrylic on linen

Diana Miller's Quilted Earth, acrylic on linen

Also, BSA Alumni are showing throughout Lismore, including at the old Lismore Regional Gallery site.

FRIDAY 1 December 6 - 8pm : Opening of Nine

BSA PROJECT SPACE
112 Dalley St, Mullumbimby
Exhibition runs from 1 - 13 December
Open six days, closed Sundays, 10am to 2pm
or by appointment 0431 034 892

 

 

Showing as part of ArtState Lismore 2017


Apollo

AMAC
James Guppy
Alex Hudson
Travis Paterson
Melissa Poole
Zuzana Kovar & Nicholas Skepper
Christine Willcocks
 


An assembly without the limits of the square

30 November - 3 December 2017
 

James Guppy's  Touching her back , acrylic on canvas, 2016  

James Guppy's Touching her back, acrylic on canvas, 2016  

Apollo is a group show from the Byron School of Art BSA Project Space.  It is a re-pairing of works and an assembly without the limits of the square: both documenting a number of past exhibitions and responding to the semi-submerged toy theatre where the exhibition is housed.
 

NORTHERN RIVERS CONSERVATORIUM OF MUSIC
Downstairs Studio, 152 Keen Street, Lismore
Thursday 12pm - 3pm | Friday 10am - 8pm
Saturday 10am - 8pm | Sunday 10am - 3pm

#PRIZENOPRIZE at The Walls Art Space

CHASE ARCHER, HAILEY ATKINS, JANIS CLARKE, RICKY LARRY, 
SOPHIE PENKETHMAN-YOUNG, MELISSA SPRATT, VEOPLE (JAY JERMYN & JULIAN CURRIE)

CURATED BY MARIAM ARCILLA

Opening this Saturday 2 December 5 - 8pm

*Opening night only performance by VEOPLE 6.30pm
**Complimentary Stone & Wood Beer and Miami Mimosas on the house, all night!

Exhibition continues until 16 December, 2017

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ABOUT #PRIZENOPRIZE
Riding along the undercurrents of Turner Prizes and Archibalds, #PRIZENOPRIZE is an exhibition that champions and democratises art across all media and levels. Think of it as a soft power alternative to the head-churning, nail-biting process that comes with applying for art awards - or being shortlisted for the coveted Bachelor rose of the artworld.

There is no prize money, entry fee or % commission on sales; instead this is an open platform for contemporary and experimental artists (especially emerging artists) across Australia to exhibit/perform at THE WALLS this December -- which we think is a prize in itself. We'll be showcasing a cross-section of works, including multi-disciplinary, projection and moving-image based, performance and large-scale installation works. #PRIZENOPRIZE 2017 marks the second year of the national open call and exhibition.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS
CHASE ARCHER is an emerging artist based in Brisbane. Chase obtained his Bachelor of Fine Art in 2015 from the Queensland College of Art and is currently completing his Honours. Archer questions how traditional media practices such as painting, print and drawing can maintain relevance in a contemporary environment that is focused on dematerialised art practices. He describes his artworks as painted collages, assembled from images ranging from personal iPhone photos, to the historic art canon. In creating artworks on translucently primed plywood substrates, which remain visible in the final artworks, Archer disrupts the ‘illusory window’ often employed in traditional paintings, creating a platform in which he presents his deconstructed artworks. Archer regularly exhibits in Brisbane and Melbourne, and recently completed a month-long residency on the west coast of Tasmania.

HAILEY ATKINS is a Brisbane based artist making work that she hopes makes people feel good and remember laughing is good stuff – especially when it’s at your own self. Her sculptural practice sits at the intersection of humour, failure and ambivalence, and explores how the resulting aesthetic can be utilised to meaningfully disrupt the negativity surrounding failure and self-doubt and help us think of alternate ways of being and knowing that stand outside our conventional understanding of success. Atkins is a Queensland College of Art graduate (BFA with Honours (Class I)) and has exhibited widely in Queensland, as well as interstate (Sydney, Hobart) and internationally (Utrecht, Netherlands). She is co-director of Wreckers Artspace in Brisbane, and upcoming artist in Residence at Kaus Australis, Rotterdam (Jan-Mar 2018).

JANIS CLARKE is an emerging artist living and working in Sydney. He has completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts (2015) and a Master of Fine Art (2017) at the National Art School. Clarke has a profound interest in the critique of painting in contemporary art. He consciously undermines established norms (both personal and historical) and to this end, he embraces failure and the anti-aesthetic sensibility as strategies for moving painting forward to somewhere new. He does this through the use of anti-authorial gestures, the kitsch of craft, and by embracing the use of so called ‘low’ colours, materials and processes such as fluorescents, spray paint, collage and decoupage. By employing counter-intuitive methods (such as ‘wrong’ instead of ‘right’) Clarke tries to undermine his own ingrained stylistic tendencies to create something unanticipated. Situated somewhere between painting, craft and sculpture, these abject principles are applied to the installation, presentation and construction of each work. Since 2015 Clarke has held three solo exhibitions and has been selected as a finalist in major prizes including the Doug Moran National Portrait Prize (2016, 2015), The Mosman Art Prize (2016, 2015), The Chippendale New World Art Prize (2015 - Winner People’s Choice Award) and the Rick Amor Drawing Prize (2016).

RICKY LARRY is a Brisbane based artist who completed a Bachelor of Fine Art (2014) at Queensland College Of Art. Since graduating from Queensland College of Art in 2014 Ricky has held two solo exhibitions and been selected for several group shows including 'Shifting Grounds’ at The Hold Gallery, West End. Larry’s art practice examines the nature of perception in relation to space, environment and form through the use of photography, video and installation. Utilising materials to challenge a logical thought process, illusions are introduced in an attempt to fracture the viewer’s go-to mode of rationality. Incorporating ‘objects’ into familiar environments to generate a “questionable image”, forces the audience to draw conclusions as they make sense of the works.

SOPHIE PENKETHMAN-YOUNG is a video and new media artist whose work explores the telling of histories through objects, museum culture and their intersection with the digital age. She examines the equalising nature of platforms such as youtube, where the BBC, Metropolitan Museum and NASA have uploaded vast archives, that now sit in the same context as beauty bloggers and school pranks. Sophie graduated from the University of Sydney College of the Arts with Honours in 2014. She is currently studying her Masters in art curatorship. Day to day, Sophie works part time in marketing at Carriageworks, does Ikebana and adDs to her archive of NASA footage and old national geographic magazines.  

MELISSA SPRATT is an emerging artist who lives and works on the Gold Coast. Melissa studied at the Queensland College of Art, Gold Coast, where she completed a Bachelor of Digital Media with Honours, majoring in Fine Art in 2015, including an exchange at the Leeds International Summer School at the University of Leeds, UK. Spratt has worked across various mediums including painting, photography, drawing and printmaking, more recently exploring textile and design elements in sculpture, and working closely with different yarn making and finger-knitting techniques. Spratt was the winner of the RADFLY Youth Art Prize in 2017, finalist in the Border Art Prize at Tweed Regional Gallery in 2016, and was invited to hold a self titled solo exhibition at The Arts Centre Gold Coast in 2015. Her most recent installation works explore landscapes, ecosystems and patterns found in plant anatomy.

VEOPLE is a collaboration between Gold Coast-based artist JAY JERMYN and local musician JULIAN CURRIE, and is best described as a place where analogue meets machine. The collaboration strives to create atmospheric journeys full of energy and enigma that demand attention and captivate crowds. Jermyn solo practice communicates the weight and importance of social acceptance through an interweaving of creative expressions including design, sound and visual art. Jermyn studied Art and Design at Griffith University on the Gold Coast where he developed a multi-disciplinary practice that seeks to confront cultural divisions, both geographical and metaphorical. His practice is influenced by journeys through Japan and Eastern Europe, and is defined by an ongoing quest to locate enigmatic identities and emotions; both of which emerge as abstract and ambiguous forms in his work.

Art on Bundjalung Country

 

Art on Bundjalung Country opens tonight at Lismore Regional Gallery.

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Increasingly, creativity is being seen as a major indicator in increasing people’s health and wellbeing. Art on Bundjalung Country is a major partnership between the Gallery, Arts Northern Rivers, North Coast Primary Health Network, Bulgarr Ngaru Aboriginal Medical Corporation and University Centre for Rural Health to stimulate artistic practice for emerging Aboriginal artists to enhance their social, economic and health outcomes. This partnership is advised by a committed steering group of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal arts and health professionals.

Throughout 2017, a series of workshops have been held across the region by established Aboriginal artists including Penny Evans, Gilbert Laurie, Francis Belle-Parker, Michael Philp, Cherie Leon and Robin Davis to pass on their creative skills to a wide range of emerging Aboriginal artists. The result will be an exhibition acknowledging the depth of current practice in the region, and celebrating the next crop of up and coming Aboriginal artists working in Bundjalung country.

Friday, December 8, 2017 at 5.30pm (for 6.00pm speeches)

To be opened by Dr Vahid Saberi, Chief Executive Officer, North Coast Primary Health Network.

Speeches will be followed by a performance by the Nini Nahri-Gali dance Troupe.

Art Piece Gallery's Inaugural 30x30 Art Prize Winners Revealed

Saturday evening revealed the (joint!) Winners of the inaugural Art Piece Gallery 30x30 Art Prize: Kat Shapiro Wood, and Vanessa Stockhard.

The $6000 prize will be divided between the two artists. As expected, a huge crowd turned out to witness the announcement. The previous day, judges Susi Muddiman OAM and artist Amanda Penrose Hart, winner of the 2017 Gallipoli art prize had considered all 230 pieces, and after much deliberation, decided to equally divide the First Prize between two artists. The exhibition of finalists will be on view at the gallery until January 22 2018.

The Winners:

Joint First Prize

Kat Shapiro Wood  Hover, encaustic on board, 30 x 30 cm

Kat Shapiro Wood
Hover, encaustic on board, 30 x 30 cm

Other awards:


Best Still Life in Show
Nick Coulson
Still Life with Jug, Hallway and Windows I
acrylic and graphite on board
30 x 30 cm

Highly Commended Awards
Gaia Barnatan
Head in the clouds
photocollage
30 x 30 cm(framed)

Clare Purser
Fassifern Valley III
oil and mixed media on board,
30 x 30 cm(framed)

Gaia Barnatan,  Head in the clouds

Gaia Barnatan, Head in the clouds

People's Choice Award
Kindly sponsored by The Mullumbimby Chamber of Commerce
This is a newly added prize of $500.00 and is only available
by voting in person, at the gallery.

This new, national, non-acquisitive prize is for a 2D work of art in any medium measuring 30x 30 cm.

Vanessa Stockard  Pleasure and Pain, acrylic on board 30 x 30 cm (framed)

Vanessa Stockard
Pleasure and Pain, acrylic on board
30 x 30 cm (framed)

Nick Coulson  Still Life with Jug, Hallway and Windows I

Nick Coulson
Still Life with Jug, Hallway and Windows I

Clare Purser ,  Fassifern Valley III

Clare Purser, Fassifern Valley III

The Walls #PRIZENOPRIZE 2017 Artists Announced

CHASE ARCHER, HAILEY ATKINS, JANIS CLARKE, RICKY LARRY,
SOPHIE PENKETHMAN-YOUNG, MELISSA SPRATT, VEOPLE (JAY JERMYN & JULIAN CURRIE)

CURATED BY MARIAM ARCILLA

Opening Saturday 2 December 5 - 8pm

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*Opening night only performance by VEOPLE **Stone & Wood Beer and Miami Mimosa's on the house all eve!  Exhibition continues until 16 December, 2017


Keep your eyes on the no-prize! #PRIZENOPRIZE returns for a second year.


Riding along the undercurrents of Turner Prizes and Archibalds, #PRIZENOPRIZE is an exhibition that champions and democratises art across all media and levels. Think of it as a soft power alternative to the head-churning, nail-biting process that comes with applying for art awards - or being shortlisted for the coveted Bachelor rose of the artworld.


There is no prize money, entry fee or % commission on sales; instead this is an open platform for contemporary and experimental artists (especially emerging artists) across Australia to exhibit/perform at THE WALLS this December -- a prize in itself! They'll be showcasing a cross-section of works, including multi-disciplinary, projection and moving-image based, performance and large-scale installation works.

Coming into Fashion: Condé Nast fashion retrospective opens at ACGC

The highly-anticipated fashion photography retrospective Coming into Fashion: A Century of Photography at Condé Nast opens Friday at The Arts Centre Gold Coast.

The greats are all here: images by Cecil Beaton, Irving Penn, Helmut Newton, Herb Ritts and Mario Testino (& more!) line the gallery walls. It's a must-see exhibition for anyone living in, or visiting the Gold Coast.

Here is what's on offer:

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Opening Night | Coming into Fashion

Friday 24 November | 6pm – 9pm | Tickets $90
The opening night party is your opportunity to mingle with the style greats and get an exclusive first look at Coming into Fashion: A Century of Photography at Condé Nast. Your ticket includes flowing drinks and delicious canapés through the night, touch-ups and tips from the experts at the Garbo & Kelly Beauty Bar, and photo opportunities at the designer vogueing wall. Once you’ve taken in the exhibition, spend the rest of the night on the dance floor with live band Tesla Coils and a vinyl DJ. As an opening night guest you will gain free entry into the exhibition plus one more ticket for when you want to return later in the season.

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Talk Suite | Coming into Fashion

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Saturday 25 November | 10am – 4.30pm | Tickets $45
This full-day talk suite will see the biggest names in Australian and international fashion come together with journalists, practitioners, and thought leaders to discuss their expertise and the future of the industry. With two full panels and two intimate in-conversation sessions, the day is punctuated by a networking lunch. Talk Suite attendees will gain free entry to the exhibition and also have the chance to mingle and speak directly with the special guests at the end of the day.


General Admission

25 Nov 2017 until 18 Feb 2018, open daily 10am-5pm (closed Christmas Day)

Coming into Fashion: A Century of Photography at Condé Nast is a ticketed exhibition on display at Gold Coast City Gallery. With unprecedented access to the vast Condé Nast archives, this exhibition highlights the sparkling intersection between photography and fashion.

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General exhibition image: Sølve Sundsbø, Love, Spring/Summer 2011© Sølve Sundsbø/Art + Commerce. Subsequent images:  Miles Aldridge, Vogue Italia, September 2002,© Miles Aldridge. Albert Watson, American Vogue, May 1977© 1977 Condé Nast. Sebastian Kim, Teen Vogue, January 2011 © Sebastian Kim Clifford Coffin, American Vogue, June 1949, © 1949 Condé Nast.

Paul McNeil | Side On at RVCA Gallery

Join us for the opening of Side On by Paul McNeil at RVCA Gallery this Thursday 6-8pm.

And see McNeil featured in the Summer '17 issue of BAM, out early December!

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TextaQueen turns nudes upside down at TRG

TextaQueen, Save Yourself (self-love self-portrait) 2013, from the series Unknown Artist, fibre-tipped markers, acrylic paint and coloured pencil on paper, Corrigan Collection

TextaQueen, Save Yourself (self-love self-portrait) 2013, from the series Unknown Artist, fibre-tipped markers, acrylic paint and coloured pencil on paper, Corrigan Collection

TextaQueen's humorous and subversive works upend the traditions of the salon nude and narrative portraiture.

Armed with a felt-tipped pen, she playfully tackles complex issues of race, exoticism, gender, sexuality and identity.

TextaQueen's engaging portraits are showcased in Between You and Me, the first survey exhibition of this contemporary artist, on display at Tweed Regional Gallery from 8 December 2017 - 25 February 2018.

The survey exhibition brings together more than 30 works, highlighting TextaQueen's compelling marker works on paper, as well as a new suite of photos created during a recent placement at Mornington Shire's Police Point Artist in Residency Program.

Tweed Regional Gallery Director Susi Muddiman said: "In 2011, the Gallery acquired a wonderful etching of The true history of the Kelly Gang by TextaQueen, which is currently on display in our collection show, Go Figure.

"This new touring exhibition, Between You and Me, is a fantastic opportunity for our audiences to witness the full extent of TextaQueen's unique practice and experience the colour and vibrancy of her work."

Everyone is invited to an official opening of Between You and Me on Friday 8 December 2017 at 6pm (DST), by Joanna Strumpf, Co-Founder & Co-Director Sullivan+Strumpf, Sydney & Singapore.

TextaQueen: Between You and Me is a Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery travelling exhibition and is supported by Mornington Peninsula Shire.

TextaQueen, Where we will go when the world implodes? (Taylor Mac) 2006, fibre-tipped markers on paper, Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, Victoria, Purchased from National Works on Paper, 2008

TextaQueen, Where we will go when the world implodes? (Taylor Mac) 2006, fibre-tipped markers on paper, Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, Victoria, Purchased from National Works on Paper, 2008

Artists: Apply to Exhibit at new LRG

Exhibition Proposals

CALL FOR PROPOSALS :: NEXT DEADLINE: 27 NOVEMBER 2017

Are you interested in exhibiting with Lismore Regional Gallery?

The first floor will showcase curated exhibitions, touring exhibitions and a dedicated gallery for the permanent collection. We will balance our program in these spaces across the year so that it reflects the diverse interests and voices of people from our region and beyond.

The prominently located downstairs gallery will prioritise local early career artists in a program of about eight exhibitions per year. The gallery is approx 9.8m x 3.5m x 3.4m (h) (download floor plan here) and has gallery lighting and hanging tracks. Artists will receive a fee of $250 per show, and be expected to help with installation/de-installation. With a large floor to ceiling window, the gallery space will be highly visible to people passing by and those engaging in activities in the Lismore Quadrangle.

Exhibition proposals can be submitted anytime throughout the year and selected by a panel.

Submitting your proposal

If you would like your artwork to be considered for exhibition at Lismore Regional Gallery, you can submit a proposal including:

• Images (10 maximum)
• CV/ BIO
• links to website (if available)
• an exhibition statement (approx. one page)

Your exhibition statement must include an artist’s statement/conceptual premise and a description of the show. You can also include ideas you have for public programming (workshop/artist talk/performance etc) and any preference for dates.

Download a proposal form here

Email your proposal to art.gallery@lismore.nsw.gov.au.

Industrial Relations  exhibition by Leora Sibony. Photograph: Kate Holmes

Industrial Relations exhibition by Leora Sibony. Photograph: Kate Holmes

Yannick Blattner | THRUST

THE WALLS Gold Coast

YANNICK BLATTNER
THRUST

Exhibition runs until 18 November

Glamour, machismo and the Gold Coast’s glitzy subtropical self-image: Yannick Blattner’s THRUST offers the provocation of symbolic displays of pointless power and pent-up energy with nowhere to go. Concerned with the dichotomies, contradictions, and paradoxes of the Australian male identity, Blattner employs cultural clichés to interpret larger cultural norms and social dynamics. THRUST captures leisure culture through the commercial manifestations of Queensland’s sub-tropical lifestyle; byproducts of a climate that is simultaneously idyllic and unforgiving.

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Yannick lives and works in Brisbane, Queensland. He was recently artist-in-residence at the Museum of Brisbane (2017), which culminated in a solo exhibition in the gallery. Yannick’s recent solo exhibitions include: All Gone Shane Warne at Inhouse ARI (2013), Low Blow at Spiro Grace Art Rooms (SGAR) (2014),Heatwave at Zeppelin Projects in Melbourne (2015), and Contrived Circumstances at SGAR (2016). He has been a finalist in the Churchie National Emerging Art prize (2015) and the Gold Coast art Prize (2015). Yannick Blattner graduated a Bachelor of Fine Art with Honours (first class) from the Queensland University of Technology (2014), during which he received the inaugural Hild Chenhall Scholarship for painting.

Entries for #PRIZENOPRIZE close this Sunday

POUNCE ON THE PRIZE: Entries for #PRIZENOPRIZE close this Sunday 12 November

An open call for a group show at The Walls Gallery, Gold Coast

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[OPEN CALL/GROUP SHOW]
CURATED BY MARIAM ARCILLA

*Entries close this Sunday 12 November at 11:11pm AEST
**Exhibition dates 2 - 16 December, 2017

Keep your eyes on the no-prize! #PRIZENOPRIZE returns for a second year.

Riding along the undercurrents of Turner Prizes and Archibalds, #PRIZENOPRIZE is an exhibition that champions and democratises art across all media and levels. Think of it as a soft power alternative to the head-churning, nail-biting process that comes with applying for art awards - or being shortlisted for the coveted Bachelor rose of the artworld.

There is no prize money, entry fee or % commission on sales; instead this is an open platform for contemporary and experimental artists (especially emerging artists) across Australia to exhibit/perform at THE WALLS this December -- which we think is a prize in itself. We're keen to showcase a cross-section of works, including cross-disciplinary, projection and moving-image based, performance and large-scale installation works.

TO APPLY:

Post a sample of your work (image, sound, text or moving image) to Instagram and tag @thewallsgc and hashtag #PRIZENOPRIZE. In the caption, add your  Artwork Title, Year, Medium, Size/ Duration, followed by your Artist Name, Location, and Website or Instagram handle. Alternatively you can email your entry to mail@thewalls.org.au or DM us on Insta like a secret squirrel.

We will announce the finalists on Instagram and The Walls website on Friday 17 November. If you are selected, we’ll tag you on Instagram and get in touch shortly after to discuss your participation in the show.

The not-so-fine print:

*Artists much be over the age of 16 and a resident of Australia

*Works on paper and photographs must be framed for exhibition purposes

*All works must be delivered to THE WALLS for exhibition by 29 November

*THE WALLS will cover the cost of returning the artworks by freight where necessary

*THE WALLS has limited resources - you may need to provide appropriate equipment for the presentation of new media works. Please consider this when applying

*THE WALLS and guest curator's decisions are final

**By participating in #PRIZENOPRIZE, you agree to THE WALLS recording and reproducing images and video footage of your artwork for promotional and documentation purposes. Work will always be credited, and, where possible, we will tag you on social media.

THE WALLS ART SPACE
4/18 Mountain View Avenue MIAMI 4220 GOLD COAST QUEENSLAND AUSTRALIA

Opening night events are held from 5 - 8pm on the first Saturday of the month from March through to December. We're open Thursday to Saturday 11am - 4pm during exhibitions, or by appointment. Closed public holidays. 

David Zwirner opens in Hong Kong

David Zwirner has announced the opening of its Hong Kong gallery on January 27, 2018 and the appointments of Leo Xu and Jennifer Yum as Directors. The gallery’s inaugural exhibition will present new paintings by Belgian artist Michaël Borremans.

From left to right: Jennifer Yum, David Zwirner, Leo Xu. Photo: Anna Bauer

From left to right: Jennifer Yum, David Zwirner, Leo Xu. Photo: Anna Bauer

As David Zwirner’s first outpost in Asia, the Hong Kong gallery will occupy the 5th and 6th floors of H Queen’s (HQ)-- the new gallery and lifestyle tower in Central Hong Kong designed by William Lim of CL3 Architects. Annabelle Selldorf, who designed David Zwirner’s New York and London locations, has overseen the interior architecture. With over 10,000-square-feet across two floors, the gallery features four adaptable, column-free exhibition spaces that can be appropriated to suit a variety of artworks. 

David Zwirner Hong Kong will be led by Leo Xu, formerly of Leo Xu Projects in Shanghai, and Jennifer Yum, the former Vice President and Head of Morning Day Sales in the Post-War and Contemporary Art department at Christie’s New York.

Leo Xu founded his eponymous gallery Leo Xu Projects in 2011. He has since presented innovative exhibitions by emerging Chinese artists and actively collaborated with leading institutions to curate a series of projects worldwide. He has introduced a roster of international artists to China. Prior to opening his gallery, Xu was the Shanghai Director of James Cohan Gallery and the Founding Director of Chambers Fine Art in Beijing. Xu will officially join David Zwirner as Director in January 2018.

During her 12 years at Christie’s, Jennifer Yum was the Head of Sales of Post-War and Contemporary Art in Christie’s Shanghai Evening sales and actively developed business in Asia, particularly in South Korea and Japan. For nearly a decade, Yum was the principal of Jennifer Yum Art Advisory, specializing in private, corporate, and institutional clients in art acquisitions, appraisals, and curatorial management. Yum will join David Zwirner as Director in December 2017.

David Zwirner’s inaugural exhibition presents new paintings by Belgian artist Michaël Borremans, one of the foremost painters working today. Michaël Borremans: Fire from the Sun will be the artist’s first solo exhibition in Hong Kong, and will be accompanied by a catalogue published by David Zwirner Books with a new essay by British art critic, curator, and cultural historian Michael Bracewell.

David Zwirner Hong Kong will be open Tuesday to Saturday from 11 am to 7 pm and is located at 80 Queen’s Road, Central, Hong Kong. 

Gerhard Richter: The Life of Images

Sharne Wolff gazes into the haze of Gerhard Richter’s career survey… 

As the producer of the most expensive work available by a living artist in Europe, Gerhard Richter is also among the most searched artists online. Google Image his name you’re met with a broad choice of categories – Landscapes, Photography, Portraits, Abstracts, Betty and so on. It’s therefore no surprise that the press release for the recently opened Life of Images at Queensland’s Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA) – the first major show of Richter’s work in Australia – claims that in this display, “we encounter Richter’s endless variation of technique and inventiveness as a painter”. That, we do.

Curated by Griffith University’s Rosemary Hawker and QAGOMA Senior Curator Geraldine Kirrihi Barlow, The Life of Images was more than 5 years in the making. Encouraged by Dietmar Elger, Director of the Richter Archive in Dresden, local and international loans were secured from 28 different sources, including Richter’s own collection. Like casting a film with multiple actors, the QAGOMA team battled to secure favoured works while aiming to maintain the chemistry of the show. The consequence of these international manoeuvres is a marvel of a display. Elegantly designed and thoughtfully curated, it’s one that demonstrates Richter’s wide oeuvre and “consistent inconsistency” yet simultaneously feels intimate and personal. A mostly minimal arrangement of works in a succession of distinct yet thematically-streamed rooms gives the paintings space, and allows for distant views – an important detail when looking at Richter’s work.

Gerhard Richter,  Strip , 2012. Digital print between Alu Diabond and Perspex, 210x230cms. 

Gerhard Richter, Strip, 2012. Digital print between Alu Diabond and Perspex, 210x230cms. 

Richter’s technical skills, artistic innovation and the divergent nature of his practice are all in evidence in the show’s opening works. The eye-catching, multi-coloured Strip (927-9), is a digital print set between dibond and perspex. Created in 2012 and marrying serendipity with op art, Strip owes its existence to a computer-generated reinterpretation of a small detail extracted from 1990s Abstract Painting (724–4). Although fans of Richter’s geometric abstract works may be disappointed that this exhibition doesn’t deliver further examples of the style, Strip is evidence that while Richter might be an octogenarian, he continues to find new ways of painting and working with contemporary technologies.

Gerhard Richter,  Ella,  2007. Oil on canvas, 40 x 31 cm

Gerhard Richter, Ella, 2007. Oil on canvas, 40 x 31 cm

Displayed at the Gallery entrance adjacent to Strip is the exhibition’s hero image, Ella. Selected for QAGOMA’s advertising material and displayed in large-scale advertisements, Ella is diminutive and beautifully quiet in the real. Acting as a taster to Richter’s distinctive blurring technique, this small painting of the artist’s daughter made in 2007 reappears as a photographic image in the artist’s momentous Atlas project. In something of a coup for QAGOMA and The Life of Images, 400 panels of collected images – perhaps around one third of the exhibition’s total space – are displayed in a long corridor. Representative of the artist’s lifelong photographic collection (housed as 800 panels in Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus, Munich), Atlas Overview is a work in its own right, and shown here for the first time.

Gerhard Richter, Phantom Interceptors, 1964. Oil on canvas, 140 x 190 cm

Gerhard Richter, Phantom Interceptors, 1964. Oil on canvas, 140 x 190 cm

Along with Atlas Overview, the exhibition is organised around six themes. In the first room – ‘Found’ – a selection of photo-paintings in multiple shades of grey begin with 1962’s Folding Dryer, the earliest dated painting in the show. Born in Dresden between World Wars in 1932, Richter and his then wife fled to West Berlin in 1961 – just weeks before the building of the Berlin Wall. It was during this period that Richter began experimenting with the technique of obscuring the clarity of his images by blurring the wet paint. The method results in varying levels of indistinctness that, according to Hawker’s catalogue essay, proposes to aid in recognising how “images are repeated and reproduced, while maintaining themselves across iterations”. It’s remarkable that Richter’s study of the ascendancy of images began well before the new millennium when, due to the internet, the circulation of images is now almost infinite with possibility. Influenced by American pop artists, Richter painted photographs sourced in magazines and advertising material, enamoured with the idea that he would be free from concerns about composition, or even deciding what to paint. Painted in 1964, Phantom Interceptors depicts a squadron of American jets engaged in protecting West Germany during the Cold War. Alluding to the Cold War tensions at the time, Richter’s hyperreal reproduction points to the way images might be analysed in different contexts.

In the mid-sixties, Richter also began to reproduce his family photographs in painting. The ‘Histories’ room includes an edition print of Betty, one of Richter’s most well-known portraits. The allure of this popular image persists even with a printed lithograph framed behind glass. It’s accompanied by his enigmatic 1965 photo-paintings, Aunt Marianne and Uncle Rudi – which simultaneously consider Richter’s personal life and German national history. While in real life Richter’s Aunt Marianne died because of her mismanaged treatment at the hands of Nazi doctors, the artist’s Uncle Rudi joined the German army. Here he adopts a proud but somewhat unsettling pose in his new Nazi uniform. In an era when painting had already been declared dead, Richter revived the medium to reproduce these photographs as history paintings, simultaneously portraying the layers of reality in an image and the limit of a photograph’s fixed or ‘true’ meaning. As one of the first German artists to tackle Germany’s recent past, Richter’s early experience on both sides of the Berlin Wall produced his unique perspective, while the blurring method enabled him to represent the unmentionable subject of Nazi history via a veil of detachment.

Gerhard Richter,  Birkenau , 2014. Oil on canvas, 260 x 200 cm

Gerhard Richter, Birkenau, 2014. Oil on canvas, 260 x 200 cm

Fittingly bookended by two of Richter’s ‘Grey’ monochrome paintings, German war history is also revisited in Richter’s attempt to paint the Holocaust – 2014’s Birkenau series. Here the Sonderkommando photographs – the only four photographs known to have been taken (and smuggled out in a toothpaste tube) from the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp – are each reproduced and then reconstructed as a large-scale abstract painting in shattered streaks of grey and white, fractured here and there by fits of green and red. As the Birkenau paintings channel, but conceal, the lasting effects of Germany’s role in War atrocities, their resonance in an Australian setting is correspondingly provocative as we seek to come to terms with our own colonial history.

The close relationship between Richter’s abstract paintings and images is also witnessed in a room of anonymous landscape paintings themed ‘Nature’. In art historical tradition, artists painted the landscape with the aim of making a perfect visual record of nature. By juxtaposing Richter’s blurred landscapes with abstract paintings that may only accidentally represent natural phenomena, the exhibition highlights the artist’s opposition to that tradition, and focuses on the dialogue between the two styles. Richter’s intention is to convey the experience of nature across both hyperreal and abstract forms is therefore borne out with the display. It mostly works.

Gerhard Richter,  September , 2009. Print between glass, 66 x 89 cms. 

Gerhard Richter, September, 2009. Print between glass, 66 x 89 cms. 

Produced with custom-built squeegees and plenty of physical strength, many of Richter’s abstracts begin with a blank canvas. Others like his dramatic image of the moment of the 11 September attacks on New York’s World Trade Centre, September (Ed. 139) 2009, are realistic paintings ‘undone’ by scraping the surface. The Life of Images also contains further examples of Richter’s abstract style across different forms – overpainted photos, painting under glass, and paintings reproduced as tapestries. Although his hyperreal paintings have generally been applauded, many have been critical of, or bewildered by, the abstract works. British artist David Hockney has been quoted as saying, “I just can’t see any profundity. He always makes the same stuff with the squeegee, which is okay, but I don’t see what’s so great about it.” Conversely, Richter has been applauded for his fascinating versatility and his ability to come to grips with, revisit, and expand on, the legacies of painting.

Whatever your view of Richter’s wild oscillation between styles, The Life of Images is a seductive display that calls you back for a second and third time. When combined with the newly-opened and innovative Reimagined Australian Collection, and upcoming shows – Yayoi Kusama’s, Life is the Heart of a Rainbow and Noel McKenna’s Landscape-Mapped – has there ever been a better time to visit Brisbane?

The Life of Images. 

Until February 4, 2018. Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane

This article was first published online at The Art Life, theartlife.com.au

A great weekend to view art in Brisbane

Anthea Polson Gallery has a pop-up gallery this weekend at The Woolshed, Teneriffe, in Brisbane. With the Gerhard Richter exhibition at QAGOMA, and Yayoi Kusama opening Saturday, it's a great weekend for Brisbane art viewing. There's also Tim McMonagle at Edwina Corlette Gallery, Adam Lester at Jan Murphy Gallery, and plenty more!

Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama

Gerhard Richter,  Ella

Gerhard Richter, Ella

Anthea Polson Woolshed Pop Up Gallery

November 2 - 5, 2017

View Exhibition     |    Exhibition catalogue    |    

  Peter Smets , Convenience    2017, oil on canvas, 75 x 90 cm

 Peter Smets, Convenience 2017, oil on canvas, 75 x 90 cm

OPENING PREVIEW
Thursday 2 November / 4-7pm
Drinks + Platters

OPENING NIGHT - MEET THE ARTISTS
Friday 3 November / 4-8pm
Drinks + Platters

EXHIBITION CONTINUES
Saturday 4 November / 11-5pm
Refreshments served

  Jodie Wells , Gentle Observation - Brown Horse    2017, oil on canvas, 80 x 53 cm

 Jodie Wells, Gentle Observation - Brown Horse 2017, oil on canvas, 80 x 53 cm

  Carolyn V Watson , pluck    2017, pastel primer, ink, willow charcoal and watercolour on linen, 49 x 55 cm

 Carolyn V Watson, pluck 2017, pastel primer, ink, willow charcoal and watercolour on linen, 49 x 55 cm

New Lismore Regional Gallery Opening Events

Join us for the much anticipated opening of the new Lismore Regional Gallery - with an entire weekend of events to celebrate!

The new gallery has its opening party on Saturday October 28, 5:30pm

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ARTIST CALL-OUT/ Ignite Studios @ NRCG

Northern Rivers Community Gallery (NRCG) is excited to announce an expansion of Gallery Services to include ‘Ignite Studios’.

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Located in the heart of the Ballina CBD, adjacent to the NRCG and housed in the historic former Ballina Fire Station, Ignite Studios @ NRCG will provide a dynamic shared access space supporting the development and participation of artistic pursuits. This exciting new addition to the NRCG facilities is scheduled to open February 2018 and will include four artist studios, a visiting artist-in-residence (AiR) studio and two access spaces for workshops, creative events, pop-up exhibitions, meetings and special projects.

NRCG is currently inviting applications for the ‘Artist Studio’ program. The ‘Artist Studio’ spaces are available for a twelve month lease to creative practitioners from all disciplines, including but not limited to, design, craft, painting, digital media, photography, filmmaking, performance, sculpture and writing. Artists from Ballina Shire, Northern Rivers and across NSW are welcome to apply.

The Artist Studio program at ‘Ignite Studios @ NRCG’ is designed to encourage co-working and an open platform for professional development and opportunity. Supporting makers and creative professionals working across various fields, the program:

  • provides professional workspaces
  • enables creative projects
  • fosters networking opportunities with arts influencers, local communities and peers through NRCG annual program
  • generates a hub for artistic practice and ideas

Ignite Studios @ NRCG – providing greater access to shared creative space in the Northern Rivers region.
Artist Studio Applications close Friday 1 December 2017.

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