Tweed Regional Gallery to host free Artist Talks this weekend

Tweed Regional Gallery & Margaret Olley Art Centre will host talks by three diverse Indigenous artists this Sunday, 2 September 2018. 

Multi-media artist Judy Watson, along with regional artists Digby Moran and Michael Philp, will be discussing their artworks currently on exhibition at the Gallery.

Digby Moran with his painting Bundjalung Stone Axe Gift of Margot Anthony AM, through the Tweed Regional Gallery Foundation Ltd., 2018 © The artist

Digby Moran with his painting Bundjalung Stone Axe Gift of Margot Anthony AM, through the Tweed Regional Gallery Foundation Ltd., 2018 © The artist

Judy Watson will speak to her work The Names of Places, currently on display in the touring exhibition Experimenta Make Sense,  as well as her artist prints held in the Gallery's permanent collection, a selection of which are currently on display as part of the Gallery's 30th anniversary exhibition Three Decades: celebrating the Tweed Regional Gallery collection.

Digby Moran and Michael Philp, also featured in Three Decades, will give insight into their works Bundjalung Stone Axe and Spotting for Sea Mullet, respectively.


EVENT DETAILS:

What:  Artist Talks

Where:  Tweed Regional Gallery & Margaret Olley Art Centre

When:  Sunday 2 September at 2pm

Gallery Hours: Wednesday - Sunday, 10am - 5pm

Cost:    Free

Indigenous Artist Blak Douglas on Government Transparency at JEFA

Openness, accountability, and honesty define government transparency. In a free society, transparency is government's obligation to share information with the people. It is at the heart of how citizens hold their public officials accountable.
 
Artist Blak Douglas asks: Do governments in fact serve the people?
What covenant has been made to the original custodians of this land?

Don't Mess with the Missionary Man  2018, 120 x 100 cm

Don't Mess with the Missionary Man 2018, 120 x 100 cm

"Transparent Covenant explores the farcical landscape of 'Australian' politics and unashamedly portrays the systemic conspiratorial actions of successive governments to uphold the genocide on first nations peoples of this continent," says artist Blak Douglas. "I employ the ubiquitous 'toilet door' figurative logos as a perfect exemplar of the faceless Aboriginal individual today. The soul stripped countryman living at the bottom of the pile amidst an ever-growing fraternity of egotistical power brokers and their 'do good' policies."

Dog's Breakfast

Dog's Breakfast

“Blak Douglas’s work is highly significant and profoundly bold in its depiction and message. What we have here is an artist that is completely dedicated to delivering the truth as he has it. Particularly focusing on what it means to be an Aboriginal man with part Irish decent in the 21st century. All the cultural clichés that haunt him and the ironies present within the “Australian Dream”.

- Julian Edwards JEFA Gallery

TransparentCovenant(invite)_Fotor.jpeg

Mitjili Napurrula: Solo Aboriginal Art Exhibition

A solo exhibition showcasing Aboriginal artworks that portray stories relating to the ancient ritual of the spear straightening ceremony will open at Mitchell Fine Art in Brisbane on April 4th, 2018.
 
Mitjili Napurrula, a Pintupi artist from Central Australia paints Watiya Juta the Desert Acacia, a source material for Aboriginal spear making and the central motif in her father’s dreaming - the story of the spear straightening ceremony.

Mitjili Napurrula, Watiya Juta, acrylic on linen, 200 x 200cm

Mitjili Napurrula, Watiya Juta, acrylic on linen, 200 x 200cm

Her paintings show the iconography of the trees, red sandhills and rocks of her father’s country to the west of Haasts Bluff in Central Australia.

Under the tutelage of her mother Napurrula began painting the female side to her father’s dreaming in 1993. Her works Watiya Juta portray the topography of her father’s country, Uwalki, and the recurring tree motif, Watiya.
 
The Spear Straightening ceremony is an important Dreaming story dealing with tribal rivalries and ancient rituals and the process of spears being made for battle.

Watiya Juta'   , 60 x 60cm, acrylic on linen

Watiya Juta', 60 x 60cm, acrylic on linen

Watiya Juta'   , 60 x 60cm, acrylic on linen

Watiya Juta', 60 x 60cm, acrylic on linen

In Napurrula’s paintings the figurative and topographical elements are applied in bright, vibrant colours on a translucent veil of white. These colours reflect her own style and playful personality.

Napurrula stems from an impressive artistic family. Born at Ikuntji (Haasts Bluff) an area 200kms west of Alice Springs, her mother was one of the principal female artists at Kintore in the Western Desert and her brother was one of the founding members of the Papunya Tula Artists cooperative.

Napurrula’s works are part of numerous international and national collections including the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Art Gallery of South Australia, National Gallery of Australia and the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory.

On Saturday 7th April at 2pm a floor talk on the life and artistic practice of Mitjili Napurrula will be held in the gallery with Director Mike Mitchell. This is a free event.